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The more you travel in the Warp, the less you physically age in Real Time. The benefits of this should be clear enough. Inheritors to the Dynasty First you need a wife. A wife is so much more than the woman who does your underwear. Indeed, that's servitor's job anyway. Believe me, there's nothing riskier than getting married. Most upper crust marriages in the Imperium are arranged, either through a treaty or marriage broker, so on and so forth and come with a complicated array of contracts, legal obligations and prenuptual agreements.

Hence, I offer two abstract methods of finding a wife. Of course, the GM is not bound by this if he or she sees a Plot Hook coming on for instance, Aberforth must return to Hydraphur to marry Zenia of the Schlomo Dynasty because their wedding was arranged at birth as part of an alliance between their Grandfathers Whenever the PC is in an appropriate situation once per game month the player reminds the GM that he's prowling for a wife.

The GM rolls on the tables below and records the results. Each step of the charts represents a Level of Success which added together will determine how many Charm Test successes the RT needs to successfully pop the question. The more quality the girl, the harder she is to woo. When he feels "lucky" i. Failure means starting over looking for another girl.

Each time a Charm Test is made successfully, the GM at his discretion can reveal the result on Chart 2, then Chart 3, then Chart 4 etc The PC may decide to give up if he's not happy with the results. The PC says he's looking for a wife and makes an Acquisition Test representing fees to the Broker, gifts to the lady and family, legal fees, etc.

The PC must choose before the rolls are made. If the results are not suitable for the PC, he may break off the engagement and try again next year. The Wife is either "With you" or "Away" meaning she's either on the ship or otherwise in the vicinity or she's "Away" living on one of your many Estates. Usually, this is self-explanatory when die roll modifiers are expressed or benefits accrued.

For instance, Social Interaction rolls. She doesn't necessarily need to be hanging on your arm to incur the modifier, but merely being on the ship might do whereas being on another planet obviously won't.

How much time you spend with your spouse will affect their "Happiness Factor". You may get a wife with contradictory results that cancel each other out or a wife you simply can't do without due to the Social Interaction bonus she gives you by being near. Alternatively, you may get a hefty nag who you can't stand, but increases your Dynasty's Profit Factor or produces fine children Or a beauty who gives great bonuses, but costs the Dynasty a lot to maintain.

You may wish to consider artificial insemination. Double-Bagger and a bottle of cheap Amasec This woman is hotter than a Plasma Reactor. Social Class is a big factor as her Dynasty is in essence merging with your Dynasty.

Often this brings a substantial portion of wealth one way or the other as she brings her Dynasty's assets and contacts or you share yours with her family. No bonuses or penalties. She always knows just what to say You have the feeling she's trying to control you She likes to spend money Sometimes on her gigolos.

She likes to throw lavish parties and expects the best of everything, which is unfortunately typical of a Lady in her Social Class. She, however, has no concept of restraint. Each year "Away" she costs the Dynasty d5 Profit Factor. She costs the Dynasty 1 PF per year regardless of "With" or "Away" status not because she spends to much but rather she neglects her social duties and the "routine maintenance" of the Dynasty's holdings.

She likes to do all the things Noble Born women do, but she doesn't go overboard. Sometimes she actually manages to increase the Dynasty's fortune with a well-thrown party with well-connected people.

Every year "Away" roll d On a "1" she costs the Dynasty 1 PF. On a "10" she gains the Dynasty 1 PF. She likes her "me" time and doesn't mind that you're gone. However else she thinks of you, she knows you're good for one thing at least. Her HF will automatically decrease by 2 every month instead of one see Happiness Factor below.

She likes being on the Ship and accompanying you on your journeys. That could be good, that could be bad. Happiness Factor is pretty simple.

If the result exceeds her Happiness Factor, she's Unhappy. For example, Rogue Trader Abdul Goldberg calculates his wife's Happiness Factor for that year and after all the modifiers are said and done she's got a HF of Every Month it goes down 1. Every time an Endeavor "Misfortune" occurs it will also go down 1. Ladies like their creature comforts, parties, High Society etc. To "Spend Time" with her, she has to either be "With You" or you have to be in a System where one or more of your Estates are located.

She'll come to you, if you're nearby. You spend 3 months on Scintilla getting your ship retrofitted, she's "Away" but you get to spend time with her, net gain of 3 HF.

You go on a 4 month journey into the Koronus Expanse, she loses 4 Happiness Factor. You can also forgo one of your alloted Acquisition Tests per game year and gain HF equal to your successes.

Hey, whatta bargain, that's not even Half! But enough to dissuade Players from throwaway marriages. You can, of course, choose one of the many fine birth control methods the Imperium has to offer, but assuming children are wanted, the PC can make a Procreation Attempt every week.

So this is intended to be used as an abstract way of keeping the Dynasty "alive" and also intended to be used with They are "House Rules" after all! You managed to take an interesting topic that could use some major fleshing out, and make me wish it was not possible to ever come up.

This was offensive, misogynistic, and thoroughly ignorant. I imagine this would be far simpler, and produce better results, if the GM created an NPC and then had her or him act according to whatever personality and motives they were given.

Depending on how the game goes the spouse and children may very much be a background detail until one of them comes to the fore, just another cog in the workings of the dynasty until one of them steps onboard the Lord-Captain's ship. As for engineering mariages for the purpose of politics and profit, it could be anything from an Influence check and the subsequent discussion with the family or organisation you'd hopefully be marrying into to a full blown Endeavour, though most likely a Lesser one.

For those less interested in all the frills and simply after good breeding stock then it might even come down to a simple Acquisition roll. The ideas that were presented were at best childish in nature. In the realm of power and influence physical beauty is irrelevant. Beauty does not equal Power. I think that marriages for a RT will all be purely political in nature. Look to Dune for guidance. The wife and husband both would have concubines or whatever you choose to call them for the purpose of physical and emotional needs.

The marriage contract will define what the requirements for inheritance of ship, material, manpower, money, and charter are. Most contracts would require the exchange of PF, ships, items, or other goods in exchange for who gets the rights to inherit the Charter upon the death of the RT or a time frame of some sort. Why does the marriage of a Rogue Trader have to be "purely political in nature"? Considering the vast wealth and freedom a Rogue Trader possess, they can pretty much marry whomever they want.

Rogue Traders might actually be one of the only noble classes that doesn't have to be press-ganged into marriage with someone they don't even know or like. Also, why would it be unlikely that a Rogue Trader keeps his or her spouse on board?

I mean, if they really care for their spouse then surely they wouldn't leave them on some backwater colony that they have founded where they can't keep them safe. Handle the subject in a bit more mature manner and then we'll talk.

The very fact that you simply assume that the Rogue Trader is a man and not a woman just screams of an immature view Taking into account the feudal nature of 40K and the very high ranking noble status of a Rogue Trader dynasty I believe that there is little room if any for a non-political marriage of a Rogue Trader or their heirs.

Marriage is far too great of a political tool at that level of society to allow for emotion to be involved. Not to say it can't develop, but up front I would say at best it would be very rare. I'm inclined to agree with Varnias here. Certainly a Rogue Trader marrying for love is making a stupid decision - but other than most historical monarchs, many Rogue Traders can probably afford to make one, just like they can afford to let one or two business deals slide if they are succesful in their other ones.

They're generally under not too much external pressure. They mostly don't have shareholders to answer to and their family hasn't got that much power over them either. A king and other land bound nobility is just that, bound to their land. They have to manage, govern and rule the lot of which they have inherited and they have to make political deals like marriage, because others demands it of them.

/p>

anyway: The Open House 4: Handshaking

I've been participating in the Forge since I basically followed everyone to the Forge, like a happy little lemming. Which is how I started reading Vincent's posts and actual play of his games. I currently live in Mukwonago, Wisconsin—which is just outside of Milwaukee. But that's only for another couple of months.

I'm finishing up graduate school in Library and Information Studies and moving back to the Kansas City area this summer. I also work at a Borders Books here in the area. I have a wife, who games with me, and a precocious step-daughter who I'm planning to adopt as soon as we have the time and money , 8 years old, who does not game yet but the wife and I are planning on bringing her into the fold sooner or later.

Because of work scheduling and school stresses, I'm not currently playing anything. I ran one session of Dogs in the Vineyard, which was the last thing I played. I've played quite a bit of HeroQuest both in Glorantha and other settings , which I love. I'm also half-assedly but enthusiastically working on my own RPG. It takes the basic conflict resolution system of Dogs, but moves in a very different direction overall.

Unfortunately, it's been put on the sidelines until school is over and my life is a bit more settled. I also write poetry and prose wrote my first novel in February and am becoming increasingly interested in copyright and IP issues, especially as they relate to the principles of universal access and free information. I've been playing role-playing games since i was 14, and have just recently begun to try my hand at game design.

I'm an Artist, but the only thing I've ever had published was one little drawing in "Revelation X: I'm a regular lurker on the Forge and rpg. I'm 34, have a wife and two kids, and try to game at least once a week. I am really interested in all of this theory stuff in an effort to make myself a better game designer. I still feel like an apprentice with all of these things, and I try to learn from the masters like Vincent.

My name is Emily Care Boss. I'm a graduate student in Forestry almost done! I'm working on a couple games right now including Breaking the Ice that I plan to publish by the summer. Hi everyone, I'm Trevis Martin. I read this blog and the Forge frequently but I don't post much my brain seemingly only good at recognizing amazing insight instead of producing it.

I live in suburban Kansas City with my wife, a roommate and two silly little dogs. I've been doing RPG's for about 19 years. My start is a little unusual as I actually started with Palladium's Robotech roleplaying game out of a love for the source material. I got into Vampire in a big way in the early 90's but was always unsatisfied with the actual play of the game.

So of course I tried to drift it to something that did what I want. In the process of doing that I started using a game called Theatrix in about My work is here. Somewhere in there, looking for additional Theatrix material, I found the Forge and the wonderful thinking there and elsewhere that helped clear up a lot of things for me. Most recently we just started a game of Vampire: It sucks and we're drifting again real fast.

My group is almost all novices with only one old veteren. I met a bunch of you great people at GenCon last year but unfortunately I didn't get to play with any of you very much, mostly due to my own shortsightedness. I have a play by post game called Revisionist History that I'm looking to get playtesters for and I host the current incarnation of the Universalis Arena , a wiki game of Uni. I'm willing to host just about anything else for people who need a little space to play or develop.

Oh and I'm a cartographer for a Geospatial engineering company here in KC, as well as a part time art teacher for a local community college. I first came here about a month ago.

I read irregularly and post even more irregularly. I just turned It seems to keep coming back into my life because it's a game everyone knows and no one has to learn. My preferred gaming style is totally freeform.

Not that I get to do it much; it's a tough sell to most gamers. Like Jack, I've played a ton of Amber—which, as played by most players of my acquaintance, is functionally freeform.

I've written many sets of informal rules in my time; I rarely get to a polished version. I'm really writing the rules because I want to play the game, and don't generally care if others play it too.

One of the things I like about The Forge is that it gives me motivation to polish my rules up a bit. Like John, I'm a veteran of rgfa.

My interest in RPG theory comes and goes; there was big gap between my participation in rfga and my recent activity at The Forge. I'm Joshua, though not Neff. I live in Connecticut, at least until August, at which point I'll leave my faculty position at the Yale School of Art to return to my career as a graphic designer. For some reason, I forgot to play with them for several years, up til about a year two years ago, when I remembered how awesome they are see the first post on my Lj.

Now my partner and I play Prime Time Adventures with them about once a month, though we blew it this month. I did the book design for Dogs in the Vineyard and am doing the same for the second ed. Under the Bed and a game of science fiction that allows you to actually do real science fiction, rather than just the window dressing. It doesn't have a name, and maybe it should. It's sort of a scifi toolkit; you should be able to do any science fiction with it; i.

My blog is The Monkey King , where I talk about games and other cool stuff. I read this a bit, when I can, and I find it fascinating. Vincent has an easy style of writing that really rips apart stuff and exposes its true meanings. I've learned quite a bit about game design here. Though I may do it professionally, I don't profess to know everything. Hey all, I'm Andy Kitkowski, and I've actually read everyone's intro post here. Y'all some interesting folk.

I'm a Small-Press indie games bitch. They've always been on the radar, but the gestalt shift was at like 3AM one weekend when I got through most of Sorcerer and Sword. Blew my fucking mind. I'm not always paying attention to what others are Working On, but when they're Done and Published, more often than not it's in my hands within weeks. I game with a group of friends, who i am converting to the System Does Matter and "player participation" agenda via little tricks I picked up in other games or just playing those other games outright, like PTA.

I have a second gaming group of more aquaintences than buddies, who game to experiement with the new cool small-press stuff out there. Since I've been on the pot, but still haven't shat - In terms of "Coming up with a game plan to design something, and not following through". The Indie RPG Awards were born for no better reason than the fact that I was 2 pages into my Future Sorcerer Supplement, my mind started to wander, and I decided to procrastinate by engaging in a huge awards effort.

I also helped Tim K auf "The Mountain Witch" with his Japanese stuff, and help others with little bits of their games: I should really shit or get off that pot, but I've still got some Ideas. I just need to sit down and work them out. Unfortunately or fortunately, for those who want the game , I have a huge translation effort underway- Translating the excellent Tenra Bansho Zero game www. Next month is "Get the final lap of translation done so that we can move on to editing and added text".

If you're here, let me just say: This game will really knock your fucking socks off. I'm only the translator, I'm not even the game's designer, and I'm saying that. It really does turn the gaming table into a stage. Personally, I now work just started last month as a technical engineer at NetApp, making sure that you keep getting your Yahoo Email. My wife Orie Hiromachi is a graphic designer www. We have two lovely cats with FIV, and one cute-as-hell kitten.

I have a gaming blog on Livejournal "zigguratbuilder" , and a LifeBlog at www. I live in Cary, NC. Time to get my Hot Springs on. How did I get here? I recently bought DitV and really liked it, and found that your blog was another source of good thinking about roleplaying.

In terms of what I'm into I think I pretty much got bored of traditional gaming about years ago. In my attempts to see what else was out there, I found HeroQuest, the forge and associated bits. I've been trying out and reading a bunch of new games, mainly indie ones and having a great time with them. I also got inspired to write my own game, based on naval adventure stories. It's currently had it's first playtest run and in deep revision.

I've also got my own blog, at http: What's written there pretty much sums up my interests. I just recently turned 34, and realized that there have been only two years that I have not been involved in a game, so I guess that makes me a bit of a lifer. I'm happy to report that Vincent and I are doing our best to raise the next generation of gamers, currently 8 and 5 years old.

It's a treat and a half to watch them start GMing for each other so naturally. And may I say they both already occasionally play cross-gender? Ok, maybe it's a pet issue for me. I read everything on this blog, and post regularly, but not so much as to be often. It's been great to read everyone's intro, 'cause I sat here saying 'yeah, that's a cool game; oh, so's that one'. Note to above groups: We should play InSpectres again!

I love that game! Also, I'm thinking geek-thoughts about the age-partnered: Oh, and what else I do: If it has to do with fibers of any kind, I do it - even fiberglass auto body repair. I teach sex ed to high school students through the UU church. I've studied Middle Eastern dance a. I graduated from Hampshire College. I do a little bit of web-design www. I read more than is reasonable for someone as busy as I am. I'm Yoki Erdtman, and you might have seen me post as Yokiboy here and elsewhere.

I'm 35, married, father of two gorgeous girls. The older of my girls is six, and we have just started roleplaying together. I game weekly, with the same gang I've gamed with since I was We are finally shifting into a more narrative style and LOVE the results. I'd like someone to convince me to buy Conspiracy of Shadows as well.

My gaming industry claim to fame is that I headed up international sales for Chessex Distribution, prior to them being bought by the Armory. Matthijs was one of my customers at the time, and probably the only one here that I know in person. Yoki, it's not v2 - it's a second edition.

A couple of clarifications, illustrations, and a better layout. I'm Ron Edwards, age 40, recently become a husband and homeowner in the north Chicago area. I'm a biology professor most of the time, and my specialty is evolutionary theory. Otherwise I publish my games through Adept Press, moderate the Forge, and do other role-playing type stuff. Especially the "really play" part. Furthermore-otherwise, I'm a part-time martial arts instructor, for adults, kids, and developmentally-delayed adults.

I'm the other half of Kat Miller, whom you've met previously. She left me very little to say, which is good because I find that I follow the same rules in posting and writing, and life, come to think of it as John Wayne used in acting: I work for a type compositor for a living. My cousins, whom I only saw on holidays, owned the games. Been GMing, and occasionally playing, ever since. I've been hanging out at the Forge for about 3 and a half years now. The NoPress Anthology's Discernment is also mine.

I should have more finished, but Kat said, our RL is very full. You might ask, Why do I post with the "S"? Do you know how many "Michael Miller"s there are? I don't think I can count that high. I'm Clinton Roosevelt Nixon.

People always ask me if that's a fake name. I'll admit that one of them is, but the other two are real. I found all these gaming-theory wackos back in late ' My gaming buddy at the time and all-around awesome designer, Peter Seckler, showed me the Gaming Outpost and I got all hooked on Sorcerer.

When the Sorcerer site and the Forge went down because their administrator let their domain names expire, I stepped in and have been flogging this horse since. I've been running my own design studio, Anvilwerks , for a few years. These days, my favorites are Dogs in the Vineyard, HeroQuest, and, well, a bunch of others. For my day job, I'm the vice-president of IT for a small company.

I really don't enjoy it. Outside of work, I play the ukulele baritone uke, actually and make folk and punk rock. It's a surprisingly rich sound. I have a cat, Violet, and a rocking fiancee. I'm getting married in December and we're going to make a kid right after that.

I enjoy this weblog immensely, although I don't comment a lot. I enjoy talking with Vincent more about religion than gaming, but it's a bigger part of my life, so that makes sense. I'm in my mid-thirties, and I'm doing my PhD at the University of Toronto about very serious stuff which isn't linked in any way to deep-seated obsessions associated with role-playing.

Like just about everyone here, I'm a long time gamer, going on for twenty-five years. More Ars Magica than anything else, but the usual range on semi-obscure games as well, and always with an interest in rules and design. Oddly, I went to university with Pete Darby a long time ago, though I never gamed with him—I know him because he did a radio show with my roommate—and I haven't seen him since.

I used to recommend it to all my RPG customers back when I had a gaming store - always wondered what happened to it! I'm Doug, some of you will recognise me from the Forge, where I post regularly. It's a pleasure to speak with all of you and get acquainted. I'm 31 and live with my long-time partner Claire. No kids, but we're planning to take in a couple of kittens instead.

I'm a Cambridge University Graduate major: Outside of this, I'm studying for a second degree with the Open University Computer Science and spending the few spare hours I have chilling with Claire and my friends. I starting gaming at school when I was nine, with Tunnels and Trolls, and stayed a gamer through secondary school. I quit for a long time because I wasn't enjoying gaming as much as I could. Nowadays, I have some very good friends who I game with very occasionally; I've lent them my copy of DiTV and I'm planning on running a town with them in the next few weeks.

I'm still a wannabe game designer - I'm not counting my current projects as they're not finished yet, I'm sorry Tobias! I read Vincent's blog regularly, but I don't post hardly at all. I don't feel that I've got that much to add to the conversation yet, but I'm reading, and learning, and thinking, so maybe that'll change one day soon.

I read here constantly, post moderately frequently. I also follow the Forge theory section irregularly. I lived with Vincent, Meg and Emily for a year longer with Emily back in the early 90's where we introduced Emily to oddball freeform low GM'd gaming. When I hit college, I got involved in freestyle although still GM'd gaming, which I vastly preferred. Mostly through the work of Sarah Kahn my spouse, and a frequent poster on rgfa back in the mid's , the shared world has developed into a thing of amazing detail and breadth.

We have recently started putting it online. I haven't actually played any of the Forge-descended games, but I'm sufficiently arrogant that I discuss them anyway. I have, however, definitely been incorporating some aspects of Forge theory into my own thinking, and into the methods of our co-GM'd game.

We used to be more communal, but so it goes. We live in a big blue and pink house in outer south-east Portland, Oregon.

We also have two cats, one of whom is very shy, and the other of whom likes to be spanked no, seriously. I've been married for a little more than 10 years, and I've lived communally with 3 of my current house for between 12 and 15 years.

I work for a research group in a university, where I help to support an estuary monitoring and modelling system I mostly do data quality assurance and visualization stuff. I have a masters degree gained under my current employer. I'm 28 years old. I'm a subsitute elementary school teacher. I live in the greater Seattle area. I've been a "gamer" for about 15 years, but have never actually played that much. I really loved but rarely played the kinds of "out there" games published by Atlas, like Over The Edge and Unknown Armies during that time, which brought me to The Forge, which brought me here.

I play every other saturday now with some folks I know from college. I've been into roleplaying since I was about ten, but my actual play has mostly been limited to a number of short-lived, unsatisfying games of Shadowrun at school, and a prolonged GURPS campaign which I left with the expression that I never actually had any fun.

I found the Forge about two years ago, and I've been a fairly regular lurker ever since. I'm still struggling with the theory there, but discovering your blog a month or two ago has helped quite a bit. I'm currently looking for a group to try the nice little collection of indie games I've acquired over the course of the last two years with, but I can't say my optimism is boundless.

Like anyone else, I'm toying with a couple of game designs of my own. I haven't actually managed to write anything down yet, but I'm determined to become more of an active participant on the various fora I lurk on this post probably being the first step , and to get myself to finally get something done in the process.

I've met Vincent and a number of the other excellent posters here at GenCon over the last few years. Most of my career in the last 10 years was with a software company making products for corporate patent management, but they finally closed up the CA office last year, so I've been dabbling in consulting again since then.

I probably can't keep that up TOO much longer. I have recently been reminded that I am flat-out weird about people I know primarily on-line. None the less, it is my goal to eat sushi with Andy K at the next GenCon, as I, too, friggin' love the stuff.

I've heard that the sushi place near GenCon is not so good. The sushi's nothing special, I've heard, and way too expensive for nothing special sushi. For everyone else, I'm 34, married since last July, and owner of a kickass dog. Last fall I published my first game, hopefully of many. I live in Milwaukee, which I don't like, yet I'm committing to at least a couple years of school here, maybe as punishment for something I did when I was younger. I found the Forge via Clinton, who has kickassly asked me to be his best man at his wedding!

Unless I dreamed it. And I met V and many of you in person at GenCon or I'm inspired by the bar V has set for game design, and I like it that he's a decent guy in person. And it's a total bummer that I only see him and many other cool people once a year.

Sushi at GenCon doesn't sound nearly as good as Italian. There is this one Italian place that's really quite good, right nearby the convention center. But you have to get a big group, 'cause their portions are ginormous. I've been reading this site for quite awhile, but this is my first post. I'm a year-old physics grad student who has been running games for various groups for about ten years off and on.

I'm currently running an Ars Magica game for my group which is going very well. I'm primarily interested in this stuff for use with my group, but I do a little design for my own purposes, tailoring or creating systems for the sake of a game. I'm not sure if this is the right way to propose a question for discussion, but I was wondering if anyone could clarify the issue of theme in roleplaying for me.

I've heard it recommended frequently that in order to have a game deal with interesting human issues, it should have a strong theme. Maybe I'm not too strong on the meaning of the term, but this somehow seemed strange to me.

Would this be like deciding the theme of the game is the conflict between duty and justice, and having everyone make characters who have conflicts related to this one and making the games all focus on different aspects of that question? Because although that is one way to focus on an important human issue, it strikes me that there must be other good ways to organize such games. I often think of "The Princess Bride" as being a movie which it would be fun to run a game like, but although that movie has some very strong emotional moments and deals with gripping human issues, I can't think of a strong unifying theme that the movie has.

Can anyone help clarify the purpose of theme for me? As it happens, I have a rough draft of an essay all about theme right here in front of me.

I'll post it this week. I personally would say the theme of The Princess Bride thusly: Thanks for the reply- I'm looking forward to seeing that essay. What made the theme of The Princess Bride unclear to me was how Wesley's quest to save his love tied in with Inigo's quest to avenge his father, which strikes me as an equally important plotline. I didn't occur to me until I read your take on the theme that Inigo's story is really about love as well, the love of his father.

There's a game in that, where the game is a story told from one to another and the relationships in the game have to somehow mirror the relationships between the storyteller and the listener.

The sushi itself was ok and note: I happen to think a lot of the sushi places I go to in the US are a lot better in quality than the sushi places I frequent in Japan , but it was just too expensive for the quality and portions. Oh, and the Indian place was pretty good. Not knock-down phenomenal, but it had totally decent fare at a great price. That's a lot like my game. I just wish it would write itself, because I am in no way going to be able to a decent job by the idea.

Hi, I'm James, I'm 28 and live in Philadelphia. I have a thankless, boring job working for a non-profit, which is why I'm hoping to have a boring but hopefully thankful job as a lawyer soon. I'm dating a wonderful girl in New York. Hi, I'm Steve Dempsey. I'm 39 and live in London the London, not some cheap Canadian imitation. I'm a civil servant in which capacity I manage several people who do maths for a living. I used to do the math myself, and was rather good at it but the Peter Principle exerted itself and moved me to a less secure position.

I edit Places to Go, People to Be http: We've got an Origins nomination so I'm crossing the pond in June to see what the fuss is about and hopefully meet some of the people I've only encountered on-line. I'm a big fan of small press games, have bought most of them and even played some! I see them as the real area of creativity in gaming as opposed to the real area of profit. My forte is writing and running scenarios. I do the occasional piece for Dying Earth and sometimes Cthulhu or Hellboy.

I've got some ideas about new games but usually find that Jared Sorensen has got their first and given it away for free. Although he still hasn't written one about struggling artists in a gothic Paris.

Steve, if the gothic paris in question is ca. Kudos to you if you can get your players into absinthe-soaked surrealism. It seems a no-brainer to me, but, well, it's something the players gotta dig. The mechanics are a balancing act of the tensions between creativity and control. But I think the game is rather fragile in that it requires much player buy-in to work and is as yet untested. But it's nice to know that I'm not alone.

Maybe I should get my notes together in a more accessible format. The subtlies are not easily dealt with. Count me in as interested in the Paris thing. I'd be fascinated to see how you handle the in-game creation of art; I have two concepts one for a game about being a rock band, and one about war journalism for which that's needed, and I've never yet seen it done well. I'm late to this thread but may as well speak up. Just turned 29 this week, married and with 2. That number also varies, as we're foster parents, which I can say with surety is a good way to scupper your game design work for a while.

I've happily sold my soul to the new wave of gaming, and am slowly trying to corrupt my local groups so that I'll have someone to play with. Not an unfamiliar position to most of you, I'm sure. I am 31, and live in a suburb of Philly James: I'm a professional computer geek. I had the pleasure of living with lumpley and ms. And now that I think of it, it's really interesting to contrast the type of game mechanics he was working with then with the kind he favors now.

I'm Mike, 34, another programmer and living in London. I've been lurking here and at the Forge for a couple of months now, re discovering RP after a year hiatus, and am continually amazed at how far things have progressed in that time.

I'm 31 years old, and I work as a fake-computer-programmer i. I've been gaming since I was like I've been lurking on the Forge for several years, at first just sort of blindly enthusiastic about everything, recently more thoughtfully digesting. I'm constantly finding little nuggets of wisdom that I can incorporate into my own play and into my relationships with my players.

Which makes me say: I'm pretty sure this game can be made to work. I'm a sucker for historical fiction and this is a period and theme I've always wanted to do. This is Timothy Kleinert. I read Vincent's blog alot, but only occassional post. My claim to fame is the very soon to be released game The Mountain Witch. Let's see, I think I've been role-playing off and on for like, 18 or 19 years now.

I started getting into design in '99, when I started working on a homebrew fantasy heartbreaker with a couple friends. About a year and a half ago I found the Forge. I started reading Vincent's blog in February after meeting the man at Dreamation. Currently I'm trying to finish my undergrad once and for all. Honestly, I would love to move into videogames after I finish my degree Na I mean, thematic videogames, maybe?

I played and GMed a lot of homebrew fantasy in the late 80s and early 90s and a smattering of this and that since them. I've been gaming for 20 years and GMing for most of that time.

I work part-time in software quality assurance—easy labor for laughable pay. I'd like to change all that. I found Roleplaying Theory, Hardcore about six months ago I don't remember how , and through it the Forge.

I play Nobilis over AIM. I'm lobbying to get my group to try Dogs. I want to write a game called Maguffin. I write stories that are exactly as long as my attention span. I'm Bradley "Brand" Robins. I'm something between 30 and older than that, and I live in Toronto, having fled from Los Angeles because I decided I didn't hate myself enough to keep living there. I'm fairly new to this forum, but have been reading Vincent's stuff and that of many other commenters on places like the Forge and RPG.

Having a degree in Rhetoric, I tend to spend a lot of time thinking about communication, gaps, and places where we have the ability to change assumptions if we can only challenge our own preconceptions strongly enough. I read journals such as this because they not only help me do that, they often give strong practical advice about actually doing it.

I love, love, love theory—but the gap between theory and practice is one of the most difficult to traverse, and I need all the help I can in bridging it.

Because of that I read the theory articles but tend to not comment, while I may chime in on more tangible issues in order to make sure I? I'm Tom Russell and I'm a programmer in the Boston-metro area. I'm 32 and I noodle around with various ideas for RPG games of my own make and many of the wonderful things off the shelf.

Despite all this, I'm not currently running anything and most of my play is d Anyway, I know Vincent through Emily and the Forge and kill puppies for satan. It's been a pleasure watching him work and I'm anxious to see what new things he comes out with. When I should be doing web design stuff at work, I'm browsing gaming forums including anyway. Vincent ran DitV for me at Dreamation this year, and it knocked my socks off. Dude, you and your Forge buddies are spoiling gaming for me—it's hard to play with my friends and their "if we keep playing, something fun is bound to happen eventually, by accident" approach.

Eric, I was the guy who kept popping in and listening during that game our TSoY game ended about a half hour before your DitV one. It was neat watching people hash out the game and make their choices for the first time.

Thanks for being my anthropological study! I'm Jeff, regularish reader never commenter. I'm a Software Developer in the Seattle area. Used to read the Forge but it got a bit I dunno - too heady for me I guess. I'm Jonas Karlsson, 25 years old and living in Sweden. The only problem with that is that I can't see myself working with it, so we'll see what happens. I've roleplayed since I started going to school, or something like that, and have met many of my closest friends through roleplaying.

In June I'm moving to a new city, Gothenburg, and I actually look forward to trying to roleplay with people I don't know. I just know I have to find a group that want to test all the new games I find; there's no way I could settle with just reading them. I've read the Forge and RPGnet for some years, but haven't posted much.

I think it was last year I started reading roleplaying blogs, and this year I've become addicted. I subscribe to the feeds of this blog, Jared Sorensen's, Andy K's, Matt Wilson's, Ben Lehman's, 20' by 20' and a bunch of others, which is a great way to get quality ideas from interesting people. I introduced myself to Anyway by presenting the game Far Apart, a Great War long-distance love-tragedy kind-of-game, that I'd just created.

I haven't played it yet and don't particularly feel like it either, even though I have a friend who's interested. This has made me promise myself that the next game I design will be one I really want to play myself, since I believe it's only the conviction that the game will rock that can make you do the revisions necessary for a great game. A great idea to have presentations, it's a lot more fun to read comments when you have an idea of the real person behind them.

My name's Jeff, and this is the first time I've exposed it in a public forum. The computer is my friend. I'm 40 years old and I'm a secondary school teacher, teaching mostly English and social studies.

I'm married with one child female, almost 4. I started on wargames when I was 14, about After school I found another group of people with whom I played RQ for the next 18 years or so.

I recognised our group when I read this about a year ago:. Simulationist groups which survive this conflict tend to be very insular, clique-ish, and GM-centered, with the GM seen as the conduit or channeller to "the game" as published.

Such a GM is usually given carte blanche authority over the social, system, and plot-oriented content of the game, and the players become fairly subordinated to the content of play. The group often Drifts the rules significantly to reflect and reinforce the immediate Social Contract; simultaneously, they become defensive and protective regarding the game title as a subcultural item.

Moving to another city and leaving my old group behind has been a mixed blessing. On the one hand I've had space and time to consider just what it was about roleplaying that had been unsatisfying; on the other, I haven't had much chance to play. I've pushed roleplaying at various non-rpers, with mixed success ie fun but no long-term converts. Right now I'm trying out a couple of university clubs, on my wife's suggestion.

I like the sounds of your games, Vincent, and I intend to buy them when our limited budget allows. I'm also a rengade from a strong religious tradition, so I can relate to some of the things you write about. My name's Dave, I read here fairly regularly and always come away with something interesting and at the Forge daily.

I spend a lotta time at RPG. I'm 31, been living in Fukuoka, Japan for gawd 9 years now, happily married to my wife Akiko for 2, presently preoccupied with the terror of heading back to the States and going to grad school - Linguistics, so I can actually get some training in the English teaching thing I've been doing for so long.

Planning to come back here when I'm finished, but looking forward to the chance to get some face-to-face gaming in while I'm there. Things tapered off in college, with warhammer taking over, and went completely away for my first few years here. I still haven't worked up the courage to try role-playing in Japanese or with actual Japanese people although I probably could, if I would just put in the effort , but I've been having a lot of fun with PbeM with a couple friends from back home.

Mage for years and now Exalted - I know, I know, very mainstream. But I really like what's going on here. I own and can't wait to play Dogs, and also have an itch to try out Otherkind if possible, as well as a whole raft of other Forge-type games.

I like to think that exposure to this bleeding-edge stuff has informed and helped my mainstream gaming. Someday when I'm actually in the states I'm hoping to get to a convention and say that in person. Don't worry, not all of it, just the "thanks" part. I have been visiting Vincent's site for a couple of years now, but have never posted anything here until this very minute. I'm 31 and have been roleplaying in some form or another since I started designing games shortly after, though laziness and perfectionism have kept me from getting anything published as yet.

I spent over a decade looking for the holy grail of universal roleplaying only to discover that there is no holy grail. I've got my own little blog now, which you should visit, because nobody has yet. I have several games coming to a boil in my brain. Chief among them is Gallant, which started as my reaction to 7th Sea, and is swashbuckly as hell.

I had some trouble with design because my brain got polluted with too much theory, but I'm better now. And I don't get to game nearly enough lately. And Jay scores the 2nd th comment award, also with a bad link to his blog.

Welcome to the club. Damn, dude, I'm envious. Good luck when you come back! Oh, and speaking of Blogs, here's my latest entry. If anyone here is a Blogwhore, please feel free to participate 'yo baaad self:. Better late than never, I guess. I'm Michael, I'm 38, and like several others here I've been gaming since junior high.

Once I graduated, of course, I pretty much went from less-than-stellar games to no games at all, until I discovered the Compuserve RPG Forum, and that was my gaming fix for several years and it's where I met some of the people I game with FTF these days. That was, in retrospect, a bit too much Amber. I found The Forge a couple of years ago. I was pretty bored with most of the RPGs that were coming out from the big publishers, and the whole small-press RPG scene was like a revelation.

I definitely have a better appreciation of the importance of mechanics and dice than I used to, and I've taken some interest in the theory side of things too, which is one of the reasons I'm here. I don't know if I'll ever actually attempt to design a game of my own, but it's still plenty interesting to learn about the process.

Oh, and I've got a little gaming blog of my own called Flaming Monkey , which is actually already linked from here. Jack Gulick, Michael Curry: Actually, that's where I met my wife, Lisa. We should get together and compare notes.

Maybe we even played with each other: I wasn't involved in most of the Guilds stuff, though, except for the DoD and the Cabal, which Lisa founded. In high school and college RPGs structured social interaction.

Talking about rolling dice beat the snot out of talking to the walls. I'll say again just how pleased I am to have all of you here. Very pleased, is how pleased! I've only been kicking around here since Vincent's essay on creating theme, but I've managed to catch up on just about all the reading. It's more of what I need. I've been kicking around the Forge for the past year or so as Technocrat13 and I can't even begin to count how much I've learned about my favorite hobby since then.

When I think back on the games I ran and played in only a couple years back, I'm embarrassed and appalled at how I used to imagine a game should run. I've had more fun playing Dogs over the past few months than in just about every game I've played in the past decade put together. The important to me being that now I know what I and my fellow players are really looking for in a game. I'm currently working on my own Fantasy Heartbreaker, and I think I might actually be close to spitting out a working game sometime soon.

Even if I don't, it seems that every attempt I make at writing a game leads me to a greater understanding of RPGs in general, which leads to greater enjoyment at the table for everyone. For the statistical bits I can't even imagine it any other way , Gamer since '87 with ShadowRun as my first regular gaming habit, and currently a flight attendant with PSA airlines Which means we can now afford to fly to all the big Cons this year.

I'm married, but no kids or anything. I didn't get into that until 3e. These days I bumble along, running my occasional Unknown Armies game and lurking through the Indie scene. I'm Christoher Weeks Chris. I share a birthday with my wife of eight years and I have two kids 10 and 3 and six cats. I've stopped working and started full-time parenting and stuff.

I expected to have more free time for thinking about games but it hasn't worked out that way. I'm living a bit south of Minneapolis and gaming with the indie-MN group. Y'all should come out and we'll have a party or con or something. I read this place in big chunks like I've been gone for a month and then go away and digest stuff and come back for more.

I come here every few weeks, but never post. Been gaming since ish, and still really dig it. I work for a big Credit Union. I like writing settings; not good at writing rules.

I created the Ultimate Game Table 'cause I'm wacky that way. I recently relocated to Phoenix, but don't know any gamers. I'm trying to make an animated movie, set in Agyris. Am currently putting my creature drawings on shirts, for fun. I'm James, and met you exceedingly briefly at Gen Con last year. I have 3 kids under 5 at home and a full time job as well as aspirations to design games, so my time is less free than it might be.

I skim here, as with the forge, and would post more often if other people weren't almost always saying what I would, only better. Eric Harlequin and I are local to each other, and serve as mutual sounding boards often. I'm 33, father of one, husband of one and owner of 2 dogs that is.

I play RPGs once every other week, mostly due to time constraints. Brennan Taylor told me to come here and check out the blog and I've really enjoyed what I've read thus far. I'm Myles Corcoran, 36 year old Irishman, father of one, husband of six years, and involved in some sort of IT support role in University College Cork, in the real capital of Ireland or so the locals would have me believe.

Despite that peculiar start I'm a big fan of simple rules Over the Edge and HeroQuest are often favourites and the whole buzz of the Indie rpg scene. I'm a big fan of Vincent's thoughtful approach to I'm 29 and live just outside north London in the U. K I live with my girlfriend of 8 years and a cat. I drifted into working with computers from working in TV via video editing. I read this blog and the Forge fairly regularly and occassionally post at the Forge which I discovered probably about 4 months ago in my quest for more interesting RPGs.

I've recently become obsessed by DitV, prompting the comment from Jen, my girlfriend "HOW many times have you read that book?!! I came into roleplaying from quite a different route than most by the sound of it. My friends and I used to play constant little freeform games that lasted for months and months. We didn't call gaming or roleplaying as we hadn't heard the term, and we used no commercial systems. Sometimes there was just a drawing of a spooky character, I remember one who looked like a frog-man in a raincoat.

Man that one was scary! We didn't like it, it was so rigid, so forced. But after a while it took over as we realised it was one way out of the eternal problem of resolving disputes about what happened.

The rules gave us a method of stopping the silly sessions, the ones where the GM might be in a funny mood and just decide that you piss your pants or whatever remember we were about 12! So from the unorthodox start I've been playing on and off for about 17 years then, in actually a fairly traditionalist fashion, but in the last five or six years have become more interested in trying different stuff. Like everyone, the desire to do something else prompted me to start writing my own RPG.

Like so many others I then encountered the Forge and had to rethink various assumptions! I'm gald to say that the core ideas have actually remained intact, but I now think I know more clearly what I'm trying to do maybe just not quite sure how to do it! Anyway, thanks Vincent for a frickin cool game and also for many very interesting thoughts on the hobby! My name is Troy, formerly with Twilight Press www. Now I'm moving from website to website gleaning knowledge for my next project.

Really enjoy your site, Vincent. I look forward to learning from what goes on here and applying it to my new design. I've lurked here for a while, but recently feel I might actually be able to make some kind of worthy commentary: My game dev blog is here , which is shared between a few other brave game building souls I've befriended online. My budding company is here. Hey, whatta bargain, that's not even Half! But enough to dissuade Players from throwaway marriages.

You can, of course, choose one of the many fine birth control methods the Imperium has to offer, but assuming children are wanted, the PC can make a Procreation Attempt every week. So this is intended to be used as an abstract way of keeping the Dynasty "alive" and also intended to be used with They are "House Rules" after all!

You managed to take an interesting topic that could use some major fleshing out, and make me wish it was not possible to ever come up. This was offensive, misogynistic, and thoroughly ignorant.

I imagine this would be far simpler, and produce better results, if the GM created an NPC and then had her or him act according to whatever personality and motives they were given. Depending on how the game goes the spouse and children may very much be a background detail until one of them comes to the fore, just another cog in the workings of the dynasty until one of them steps onboard the Lord-Captain's ship.

As for engineering mariages for the purpose of politics and profit, it could be anything from an Influence check and the subsequent discussion with the family or organisation you'd hopefully be marrying into to a full blown Endeavour, though most likely a Lesser one. For those less interested in all the frills and simply after good breeding stock then it might even come down to a simple Acquisition roll. The ideas that were presented were at best childish in nature. In the realm of power and influence physical beauty is irrelevant.

Beauty does not equal Power. I think that marriages for a RT will all be purely political in nature. Look to Dune for guidance. The wife and husband both would have concubines or whatever you choose to call them for the purpose of physical and emotional needs. The marriage contract will define what the requirements for inheritance of ship, material, manpower, money, and charter are. Most contracts would require the exchange of PF, ships, items, or other goods in exchange for who gets the rights to inherit the Charter upon the death of the RT or a time frame of some sort.

Why does the marriage of a Rogue Trader have to be "purely political in nature"? Considering the vast wealth and freedom a Rogue Trader possess, they can pretty much marry whomever they want. Rogue Traders might actually be one of the only noble classes that doesn't have to be press-ganged into marriage with someone they don't even know or like.

Also, why would it be unlikely that a Rogue Trader keeps his or her spouse on board? I mean, if they really care for their spouse then surely they wouldn't leave them on some backwater colony that they have founded where they can't keep them safe.

Handle the subject in a bit more mature manner and then we'll talk. The very fact that you simply assume that the Rogue Trader is a man and not a woman just screams of an immature view Taking into account the feudal nature of 40K and the very high ranking noble status of a Rogue Trader dynasty I believe that there is little room if any for a non-political marriage of a Rogue Trader or their heirs. Marriage is far too great of a political tool at that level of society to allow for emotion to be involved.

Not to say it can't develop, but up front I would say at best it would be very rare. I'm inclined to agree with Varnias here. Certainly a Rogue Trader marrying for love is making a stupid decision - but other than most historical monarchs, many Rogue Traders can probably afford to make one, just like they can afford to let one or two business deals slide if they are succesful in their other ones.

They're generally under not too much external pressure. They mostly don't have shareholders to answer to and their family hasn't got that much power over them either. A king and other land bound nobility is just that, bound to their land.

They have to manage, govern and rule the lot of which they have inherited and they have to make political deals like marriage, because others demands it of them. A Rogue Trader is his or her own political entity, and they aren't bound to any planet or realm. They can come and go as they like and pursue pretty much any endavours they want, they don't have to respect the wishes or expectations of other nobility like kings, queens, princes or princesses' have to.

Monarchic family members are bound by the society of which they live in, Rogue Traders aren't bound by anything. Now while a Rogue Trader COULD profit from marriage if he or she were to marry with the offspring of a more succesful and powerful Rogue Trader, and be able to cash in a hefty chunk of dowry for it, there isn't really anything that insures that this is the course of action a Rogue Trader would take.

Remember that such a marriage would entail a lot of obligations, meaning quite simply a limitation on their warrant of trade. Suddenly the "shackled-in-marriage" Rogue Trader isn't as free to enjoy his or her warrant of trade anymore. Suddenly they have obligations to consider. Suffice to say that some Rogue Traders value their freedom a lot more than any coinage they could acquire through the voluntary imprisonment of marriage.

They are after all quite the diverse and eccentric bunch, with varying values and ideals. Some Rogue Traders might simply want to marry out of love and all that romantic bull. And some might simply prefer to roam wild and free, and have "a lover in every port". But there is nothing that says that one sort of Rogue Trader would be more common than the other simply because the Imperial society is very feudal in nature.

Yes the society is feudal, but Rogue Traders aren't bound by society as the lower, planet-bound nobility are. They have rights and priviliges that even sector spanning noble houses can only dream of. In fact, it is the sector houses that want to get their sons and daughters married to Rogue Traders and will most likely pay dowry for it. Some Sector Houses have to do it because their dynasty would crumble if they don't acquire the connection and power that a liason with a Rogue Trader provides.

It is the landlubbers that are dependant on Rogue Traders, not the other way around. I apologize for not working it out for female RT's, but you know as well as I do that the vast majority of players are going to run male characters.

I could make up charts for female RT's equally offensive to men, but it would only be seen as hilarious, because well The entire idea of arranged marriages ARE misogynistic. Love might not enter into it, but it's more than finding a match with good genetics and a hefty dowry. And as far as "looks not having anything to do with it", it's not looks per se, but general ladylike grace and social comportment, of which looks is a part of. One need look no farther than American politics to see how important that factor is to potential Presidential, Congressional, Senatorial and Gubernatorial candidates.

If it made absolutely no difference, then Michelle Obama's pants would never make the evening news. Don't underestimate the power of the woman behind the "Throne". Oh now that's something you can't really predict. Just look at the trends in MMORPG-gaming where male players actively choose to play female characters instead of male characters if only to be able to rest their eyes on a well-shaped female posterior during gaming instead of having to look a the ass of a buff barbarian man.

The same goes for table top RPG's. I tend to shy away from female characters myself, but that's mainly because I have the rather prejudiced idea that "girls are different in mindset than guys", and that I wouldn't be able to portray a woman as well as I would like.

In truth this is a neurosis on my part, there really isn't very much scientific backing that women are inherently different in mindset than men and no I don't care for much of the pseudo-science in measuring brains as sound scientific proof, so don't bring it up please , but from my subjective point of view, they seem different in a way that I feel that I can't emulate very well.

It would be awesome if I thought I could, but I guess this is one of the few aspects where my otherwise generous amounts of confidence is lacking. Then of course there's the extremely neurotic guys who think: What if it makes me gay or transgendered?! What if the other players start to think im gay or transgendered!?

I can't risk it!!! You have to be pretty open minded to try out RPG's anyway. Actually, arranged marriages strikes out at the man as well, so I'd say that the concept is more misanthropic than just being misogynistic. What's misogynistic is the fact that in some countries where arranged marriages are commonplace, the man have more rights to divorce than the woman has. But then again in some cultures the woman had more rights to divorce the man, making the laws misandric instead.

But arranged marriag in general strikes out at both parts, not just the women. But it seems like the way things are done in the Imperium and it's a good thing it's not real life we're talking about here.

Remember in Rogue Star, the dude's second marriage was arranged as his first wife died. The entire thing was contractual. He got some estates etc. He wanted a son to carry on the Dynasty name, but it was part of the marriage contract that the son would be the Heir to the Dynasty, where it should normally have gone to the older sister from the first marriage. So when dear old Papa died, the wife literally gains the entire Dynasty via her son, as she's now the Matriarch.

It was the source of tension an a major theme through both Rogue Star and Star of Damocles because the sister felt screwed out of her inheritance which she was Can't say I've read Rogue Star, but I just don't agree that political or arranged marriages are "how things are done" among Rogue Traders. Mainly because it makes no sense. The inheritor of a warrant of trade get so many freedoms and opportunities just by having it, there's really no reason for a Rogue Trader to be press-ganged into an arranged marriage at all.

If they don't want to marry their business is highly unlikely to crumble because of their refusal to marry. It's not really a concern to them unless they make it their concern meaning that the marriage is more voluntary than arranged.

If we had been talking arranged marriage among normal nobility, or even commoners it would be a completely different matter. They are still a part of not only the Imperial society but their planetary society as well.

Apparently my real world power metaphor was lost on you Varnias. It had nothing to do with being land bound. It had to do with illustrating that a Rogue Trader has a level of power and station within the Imperium of man equal to that of a king years ago.

Maybe I was not explicit enough. A RT is equal to the king of Denmark, master of his domain and what not, until he leaves the Imperium. At that point he becomes the king of England, Holy Roman Emperor, what have you, as the incarnate voice of the god emperor of mankind. Rogue Traders are bound by Imperial law while in the Imperium. Outside of those borders are where their true power comes into being.

As far as being press-ganged into marriage, huh? We are talking about Rogue Traders not a 5 th in line to a minor governorship prince. There is also the Queen Elizabeth strategy of the promise of maybe. A maybe can be powerful enough in some circumstances to net you a profit from multiple parties vying for a marriage that the RT will never allow to go through.

Hang on a sec. Why does the physical appearance of the wife have a bearing on the stats of children? Looks are a factor in the Fellowship stat. Granted, you can have a great Fellowship Stat and not be physically attractive, but being good looking certainly helps.

Other than that, it doesn't really matter. I gave bonuses to some stats just to balance out the negative to Fellowship really. For instance, on the charts I made up, you could have a plain or even unattractive spouse who still produces fine children due to good overall genetics It boils down to this: If you don't like the idea of randomized arranged marriages in your game Nothing I can do about that, sorry.

Make up your own Politically Correct Unisex system if you want. Warning though, it also assumes your Samurai is a male Because actual females consider Orc females to be ugly.

Uglier than Troll females. I don't agree, but that's the statistics I'm not making this up, there was a guy who did research for his college thesis and Sony Entertainment did extensive market research on it. This doesn't apply to PNP RPG's because the "horny pimply teen boy giving freebies and favors" factor doesn't come into it unless there's an actual girl sitting at the table, and there's the macho factor.

Another thing you have to understand is that even in pre-television times, it behooved a politician or noble lord to have a wife who could entertain, socialize and maintain important business and social contacts. TV is only good for influencing the masses, which aren't as important as face-to-face meetings with lieges, campaign contributers, vassals and various other important leaders and dignitaries Another problem with Unisexing the charts is that women in power have different motivations, needs and goals in a mate than men do.

They do care less about looks or political advantage and more about actually liking the fellow. Take the Queens Elizabeth for example. The Elizabeth the 1st never found a mate with enough power and status who she could trust and actually liked, so she never married.

Elizabeth the 2nd might be cold and aloof like most British Royalty, but she probably loves the Phillip, the breeding is right and she never had to worry about him trying to steal her throne.

Prince Charles is a prime illustration of what happens when you marry below your Station. I love Di, and I'm not blaming her for the failed marriage, but as it turned out it would have been better for both of them if Chuck had just married ugly old Camilla in the first place.

Why did he marry Di in the first place? What were you saying about "Looks don't count"? A lot of people felt it more important for appearance sake and overall political advantage for the Prince to be seen with a young, charming bride than marry one of his cousins. The Lord Commander Planetary Governor isn't going to let his daughter or son marry a manual laborer just for love.

Or a member of a rival political Dynasty. Yes, I smell a plot hook here too, but it would never be the norm. Oops, there I go again being chauvanistic Well, there is a flaw in the genetic point of view, and that would mainly be that if a good looking woman well, there really doesn't exit such a person that is considered attractive to EVERYONE, but for simplicity we'll use the term "attractive" or "good looking" in relation to that most people would agree that the person is, discounting the minority that might think different and a good looking man sire children together, their children would also grow up to be good looking people.

The flaw here being that there really is no telling which genes are dominant and which are recessive in the man and the woman. For instance, the woman could have a grandmother with a nightmarish appearance, and those genes might be dominant in any children that her grandchildren would produce, and even be dominating over the mans "good looking" genes, meaning that their particular configuration might produce the ugliest children ever.

Then there's also the combined configuration to consider. Some aspects considered "good looking" might not be in harmony with other aspects. A pair of trousers in one specific colour might be good looking, and a shirt in a radically different colour might also be good looking. But if you wear both at the same time you might look like your fashion sense and taste is a bit retarded like wearing a pink shirt with grey trousers or a pair of blue jeans with a lime green shirt etc. So there really is no telling of the final appearance of the children by just looking at their parents physical appearance Unless of course you factor in genetic engineering, which may or may not be a common occurence when Rogue Traders start a family Sure, I could have made it more complicated by adding abstract percentage chances to represent random genetic factors I didn't take into consideration on Chart 6 Genetics: You're orbiting Flatulous Prime and are expecting the Trade Delegation from the local Chartist Union aboard to try to negotiate a very important trade agreement.

She's attractive, well-spoken, well-connected, a wonderful conversationalist and throws an elegant and gracious party. As if that weren't enough, she owns her own Brewery! She's going to schmooze the Trade Delegation, relax them and butter them up for your business pitch, adding to whichever Fellowship based rolls you may need to throw. She's unattractive, outspoken, tacky and has a voice akin to the screech of a ptera-squirrel.

Initially, she added to your Dynasty's Profit Factor due to her being higher Social Status than you and her many shady contacts with various Imperial bureaucracies. She's also a shrewd, if not ruthless businesswoman. These traits contributed greatly to your Dynasty and you may not have been able to rise so high if it weren't for her.

She even ignores your frequent indiscretions, but as agreed from the beginning, you now serve as her ladder to power. You could tell her to stay in her stateroom, but if the Delegation found out your wife was aboard it would look bad that she was not in attendance and you weigh the negative modifier of her awkward absence against actually having her attend.

You wish you'd just left her on Scintilla "Away". She's hawt, hawt, hawt, but a brainless twit. She's notorious throughout 3 Sectors for the idiotic things that tumble out of her mouthhole at precisely the wrong moment. You wisely decide to lock her in her Stateroom with an armed guard, hoping she won't embarrass you further by seducing them. She manages not to adversely affect the Dynasty's Profit Factor, but you suspect your children might have increased chance of Mutation due to her clubbed thumb.

You should have gone with the Plain Jane with the sweet temperment from Hohum Dynasty It's not just looks, but it's just one of the many factors that gives an indicator of what makes up a "good" spouse or not.

That wasn't the issue. The issue was that an ugly wife would result in the children automatically being ugly as well. You could simply remove the "children will have a Fellowship" aspect if you want to keep things reasonable. As for a good spouse and his or her function in a business meeting. If I were the Rogue Trader, I wouldn't keep my spouse around such important affairs.

We all know that the most savvy and skilled businessmen are cold and almost psychotic single men with a narcissistic streak just look at Wall Street. And that's the philosophy I'd apply in any business meeting. Having the spouse around implies that im "human" and "can be related to", which of course implies that I have human weaknesses, that I can be cheated and exploited.

I enjoy gaming of all types, but role playing is one of the biggest stress I live in Urbana, Illinois with my wife Amy and our 3-year-old It's cause I'm an angry ass person. .. I had been snubbed for being a girl gamer with 3 different groups .. My interest in RPG theory comes and goes; there was big gap. Loonies: The guy who will do anything for a cheap laugh, including casting a Real Rôle-players: sigh with relief to know they're not alone, and then get their Munchkins: have them all, and like to roll as many as possible Real Men: Play Macho Women With Guns / Renegade Nuns On Wheels . Real Men: Old Abusive. I can picture the advertisement for the KABAL RPG in early s issues of Dragon so I remember getting some xeroxed sheets of monster descriptions from Gary so I I'm so old, I remember when D&D 3rd edition came out. .. Green covers with roses on them meant that a girl might show up to play. .