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W hen we lived in England, one of my favorite things to do was to pause for cream tea in the afternoon. It really only takes a few minutes, too. These cream scones are prepped and out of the oven in 20 minutes flat. You mix them up—all five ingredients—with a fork in a single bowl, and pat them out on their baking tray. Tidy up the kitchen and brew a nice pot of tea while they bake, and settle in for a few quiet minutes. Cream tea is an afternoon tradition in England.

British tea is served with milk and accompanied by scones, clotted cream, and jam; strawberry is traditional. These cream scones are plain but unusually tender and rich.

To serve them, split them as you would an English muffin, spread them with clotted cream, and top them with a spoonful of good strawberry jam in the Devon tradition, or, in the Cornwall tradition, reverse the two and put the jam on the bottom. It is produced by indirectly heating unpasteurized milk and cooling it in shallow containers, during which clots, or clouts, form as the cream rises.

The proportions of cream to flour are correct. Measure your flour by scooping and leveling. I use an exceptionally thick cream. The dough should be very soft. Clotted Cream from the Sustainable Table blog Yield: While they bake put on a kettle of water for the tea and skim the clotted cream into a container. Put the remaining liquid cream into another container.

I can hardly stand to look at this post because I love clotted cream and scones. And the new rose mauling no idea how to spell that word is lovely. Kris, you have to come over and eat some! Thank you thank you thank you.

Your Homemade Clotted Cream just made me the happiest girl in the world. Anyway, I just discovered your blog and I love it so much!!! I just discovered your website. This is a lovely site. I am new at making scones. Is adding butter in the scone recipe an American thing? Any insight on this. I use very thick cream from a farm and good flour when I bake these scones, and have heard that thin cream is a bit too much. You might try reducing the cream just a bit. The dough will be quite soft and require a bit of flour to handle it, but it should not be liquid.

Thanks for getting back so soon Laura. We were wondering if we can feature it on our site. We will be launching a new network for food bloggers, foodies and amateur chefs and would love to have you be part of it.

You can visit us at http: I want to make English Tea baskets for Christmas gifts and would love to include clotted cream. Do you know if it can be canned? I have only seen commercial clotted cream in refrigerated cases and marked with expiration dates. I wish I could be more help. None of my canning resources address it. Perhaps if you want to include it, keep it refrigerated in tightly closed jars until you make your deliveries and tell the lucky recipients that it has to go into the refrigerator right away.

I just tried this on the weekend and it turned out wonderfully. From what I can remember this was really similar to what I had then. I posted a blog about it if you would like to have a peek — http: Thank you so much for sharing this recipe! I just found this post through Pinterest.

I love afternoon tea. Such a respite — helps me get through the evening. I enjoyed reading your post — it put me in the mood! I would buy clotted cream try whipping in sugar , eh! I could not figure out how the tea houses got it sweet and thick, unless perhaps it was a really thick cream and added sugar. I have never been to England would love it but I do love a good tea. Thanks for your great instructions and pictures!

The first time I made clotted cream was for the most recent royal wedding. I decided to have a party at am US-EST and the entire town was sold out of traditional scones and clotted cream was no where to be found. True American style, I had 4 pans going over double broilers on the stove top and was able to get enough clotted cream to serve my purposes for the next day and all within 4 hours!

It was so incredibly good. I decided I would go about it proper this time and found this recipe. I had the cream in the oven for 8 hours, let it set for about 4 and placed it in the fridge overnight. The top turned a caramel color and the cream underneath was syrup-like in consistency and tasted it a bit caramelish. I wonder if your oven thermometer is off a bit. I might try buying a little hanging oven thermometer and placing it in your oven to check the temperature.

I suppose it may be the cream. Are you using something ultra pasteurized or with additives? Absolutely love your blog!!!! Discovered the wonderful awesomeness that is clotted cream recently. I am curious though, why not ultra-pasteurized cream? Oh, thank you so much! That is so kind of you. Clotted cream is something of an obsession at our house.

Besides the issue of ultra pasteurization, you want stellar cream here. The ones I use here are incredibly thick, have a golden glow from pasture grazing, and have a thick knob of cream at the top of their glass bottles. If you can get your hands on something like this, the clotted cream you make with it will amaze you. Thx for the recipie. Your site welled up in me deep scentiments and great memories of her.

Thanks for a great site. Do you have a newsletter for other recipies? The scones look yummy. I will have to try to make the cream, I wonder if regular whipping cream will work. I have not heard of your brand. Janice, Yes, whipping cream should work. Clotted cream is not sweet, but it is delicious. Hope you enjoy it! Simple Puy Lentil Soup with Spinach. Preheat your oven to degrees. In a medium bowl, stir together the dry ingredients with a fork. Pour in the cream and stir it in with a fork.

Give the dough a few gentle kneads with your hand. Cut the circle into eight equal triangles and separate them. Brush the scones with the melted butter and sprinkle them with the sugar. Bake for 17 minutes, or until they spring back a bit when pressed. These scones are best the day they are baked.

Serve warm or at room temperature. Pour the cream into an oven safe pan or dish such that the cream rises one to three inches deep. Cover the pan or dish, and bake for eight to 12 hours, or until the cream has formed a thick, yellow skin. Cool the cream at room temperature, and then refrigerate it for eight hours. Skim the yellow clotted cream from the top and serve. You may use the cream that remains below for baking. A Proper Cup of Tea Method:

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Three Things I’m Looking Forward To In – Mr. Free At 33

Thank you thank you thank you. Your Homemade Clotted Cream just made me the happiest girl in the world. Anyway, I just discovered your blog and I love it so much!!! I just discovered your website. This is a lovely site. I am new at making scones. Is adding butter in the scone recipe an American thing? Any insight on this. I use very thick cream from a farm and good flour when I bake these scones, and have heard that thin cream is a bit too much.

You might try reducing the cream just a bit. The dough will be quite soft and require a bit of flour to handle it, but it should not be liquid. Thanks for getting back so soon Laura. We were wondering if we can feature it on our site. We will be launching a new network for food bloggers, foodies and amateur chefs and would love to have you be part of it.

You can visit us at http: I want to make English Tea baskets for Christmas gifts and would love to include clotted cream. Do you know if it can be canned? I have only seen commercial clotted cream in refrigerated cases and marked with expiration dates. I wish I could be more help. None of my canning resources address it. Perhaps if you want to include it, keep it refrigerated in tightly closed jars until you make your deliveries and tell the lucky recipients that it has to go into the refrigerator right away.

I just tried this on the weekend and it turned out wonderfully. From what I can remember this was really similar to what I had then. I posted a blog about it if you would like to have a peek — http: Thank you so much for sharing this recipe! I just found this post through Pinterest. I love afternoon tea. Such a respite — helps me get through the evening. I enjoyed reading your post — it put me in the mood!

I would buy clotted cream try whipping in sugar , eh! I could not figure out how the tea houses got it sweet and thick, unless perhaps it was a really thick cream and added sugar. I have never been to England would love it but I do love a good tea. Thanks for your great instructions and pictures! The first time I made clotted cream was for the most recent royal wedding. I decided to have a party at am US-EST and the entire town was sold out of traditional scones and clotted cream was no where to be found.

True American style, I had 4 pans going over double broilers on the stove top and was able to get enough clotted cream to serve my purposes for the next day and all within 4 hours!

It was so incredibly good. I decided I would go about it proper this time and found this recipe. I had the cream in the oven for 8 hours, let it set for about 4 and placed it in the fridge overnight. The top turned a caramel color and the cream underneath was syrup-like in consistency and tasted it a bit caramelish.

I wonder if your oven thermometer is off a bit. I might try buying a little hanging oven thermometer and placing it in your oven to check the temperature. I suppose it may be the cream. Are you using something ultra pasteurized or with additives? Absolutely love your blog!!!! Discovered the wonderful awesomeness that is clotted cream recently. I am curious though, why not ultra-pasteurized cream? Oh, thank you so much!

That is so kind of you. Clotted cream is something of an obsession at our house. Besides the issue of ultra pasteurization, you want stellar cream here.

The ones I use here are incredibly thick, have a golden glow from pasture grazing, and have a thick knob of cream at the top of their glass bottles. If you can get your hands on something like this, the clotted cream you make with it will amaze you. Thx for the recipie. Your site welled up in me deep scentiments and great memories of her. Thanks for a great site. Do you have a newsletter for other recipies?

The scones look yummy. I will have to try to make the cream, I wonder if regular whipping cream will work. I have not heard of your brand. Janice, Yes, whipping cream should work.

Clotted cream is not sweet, but it is delicious. Hope you enjoy it! I also like to hear what my readers come up with, and may make some modifications if my desired outcome is way off the mark. Your writing is incredible — over the years I have seen it evolve and expand, and what I see it as is an opportunity for me to write a bit of my own story that is piggybacked onto yours.

Just like going to see a movie with of my closest friends. There will be different experiences of that one story told, and it provides an opportunity to discuss, reflect, and expand. I just have to remember to bring equanimity to my conversations, and hope to be on the receiving end of that as well. Off to the rat race, my busy-ness, or as I call my warehouse, the salt mines. I am looking forward to more of you inspiration!! This year is going to be a great year for me in the investment world.

This will rocket me and my girlfriend to a lifestyle likes yours! Best of luck in !! Really excited for you guys. If you can commit just a few years of really extreme effort, you can set the rest of your life up. I would also suggest to visit other Baltic states Latvia and Estonia. Also if you would like to see the real cheerlessness extreme visit Ukraine. The country is in trouble now but people are in general very friendly especially in the west part Lvov.

I think US as well as EU residents has visa free visiting there. Yeah, there are so many amazing options throughout Eastern Europe. So you could stay in, say, Prague one summer. Then it could be, say, Tallinn the next summer. Many of the European countries legally collect the worldwide income taxes including capital gains and dividends earned outside the countries.

It only applies to who is a tax resident one who stays in the country for days or longer a year. If one stays in two countries less than days each , this person will not be liable for any worldwide income taxes. We earn dividends and other distributions from the US corporations and are liable for the taxes in the United States I have no issue for this taxation. We then found that Portugal offers the non-habitual residency status that enables foreigners to exempt from the worldwide income taxes outside Portugal for 10 years if registered.

At this point, we plan to visit a few cities in Portugal in November and plan to move to Portugal after we complete our school in Mexico Jan or Feb …. If I were single, I would have lived in Chiang Mai for a while.

There are a lot of people that actually just kind of bounce around from country to country every couple months. That said, double taxation almost never comes up for anyone. There are usually bilateral agreements in place, investment income is very favorable, and the FEIE has a pretty healthy upper limit. So if that involves staying in America, awesome.

If that means bouncing around every few months, fantastic. Excellent stuff, I have just recently been looking into dividend expat life. I am well away from that but I think that in the long run that might be something I would like to do. I will have to do my research but getting experiences from people that are doing it now are priceless.

Hoping I can continue to share what I learn and inspire others to also make their dreams come true. Hi Jason… Those beaches in Thailand, look great. That is definitely an area that I would like to visit someday. I have been early retired for 3. There are definitely lots of interesting places to visit in that region that are pretty affordable compared to the rest of Europe. Budapest is the favorite place that I have been to on my trips so far, although I really enjoyed visiting Moscow too.

I have visited Budapest four times and I am going back again this year. I am sure that you will have a great time there. One country that you should check out if you have time is Ukraine. It is an extremely cheap place for tourists right now and it is a very interesting place to visit. Lviv, Odessa, and Kiev are the top cities to see in Ukraine. Totally agree with you in regard to Eastern Europe, especially Budapest. And neither is Budapest. Plus, Budapest happens to be a pretty popular spot for a lot of people doing things just like myself, which is another benefit.

The concentration of like-minded people here relative to the US is one reason I really enjoy living in Chiang Mai. Probably not for me. But there are a lot of options throughout Eastern Europe. Hi Jason…Thanks for responding to my comment. I agree with you on not focusing only on costs by trying to find the cheapest places, but looking at value for the money you are spending.

Ukraine is definitely a place that gets mixed reviews. It can be challenging to find rentals for months in Budapest for a reasonable price in the summer not sure what your budget is? Most apartment owners want 12 month leases or they rent out their places daily on Airbnb. Seems like you are pushing your human capabilities, becoming a better person, more well-rounded, knowledgeable of cultures — all while having more energy than ever to do so.

Very happy for you Jason and am looking forward to to your continued journey. Looking forward to what will bring us all. Stumbled across your blog here. I was an avid reader of the D-M blog your ran previously and wondered where you wandered to. I too am looking forward to I am so busy with the things I want to do, that I have no time to do nothing. I decided to learn a musical instrument a very difficult one so I would never feel accomplished!

No time to be bored. What I find when being a not-working person is that one must have goals, one must have things that mean something. This means I have things to look forward to, and happy to have this life to live. I totally agree with you. In fact, I honestly have no idea how I fit in a full-time job before. I was allocating more than 50 hours per week to the dealership back in the day. I look back on it and kind of laugh, but I needed the experience, capital, and perspective to allow me to grow into what I am today.

Did my second PF coaching session today and it was a blast. Any good resources to improve as a financial coach? I believe experience counts when it comes to most matters.

Always something to learn. Always something to improve on. But a lot of that comes from within, after experience and reflection allows for growth. My sister-in-laws family visited Budapest and the surrounding area last year. They loved it and it makes me want to visit there as well.

Just need to figure out how to make 7 plane tickets affordable…lol. Good Day Jason what a adventurous life you have had so far. I think the best things lay ahead of you. I have enjoyed the adventures you have written about, very inspirational. I hope is a great and prosperous year for you. I hope you meet and exceed all of your goals. I hope is a wonderful year for all of us. So much to be excited about. So much to look forward to.

So much to accomplish, experience, and share. Hi Jason, Thanks for sharing all your experiences abroad. Take care my friend. Your friend from West Palm Beach. I like that the things you are excited about will also foster curiosity, creativity and fulfillment.

The money is just a means to an end. And the end should be an improved ability to strive toward your potential as a human being. Most of the fun is in figuring out what that looks like as you go.

I really want to use it as a central base for most of the year, then jet off to sunnier climes over the winter period…. Or catch you at one of the FI meet ups in Pest: I really mean what I say. So much to do. So much to see. So many mistakes to make and learn from! Being based in Budapest sounds great. Perhaps even as early as this summer.

So many people get up in the morning, go to work and be stressed out all day, come home, go to bed, and do the same thing the next day for months if not years on end. I dream of one day living in England. Mostly because I love the accent and want to develop that British accent.

But I love the idea of just living in another country, experiencing another culture, and enjoying every step of the way. Looking forward to hearing more about your experiences in Thailand. I gave it the kind of effort, focus, and intensity that is hard to put into words, but it was all worth it. Living in another country is very interesting.

Makes every day sort of an adventure. I am 48 years old with an up bringing similar to yours in regards to finances and family. You have inspired me to do the following things: I am looking for a place to retire comfortably outside of the United States. I finally accept the reality that my husbands consumerism spending and my need for financial independence will NEVER Work so the focus is on my own happiness not others. Thanks for being such an inspiration to us all.

35 years ago, The Thing was panned by critics. It's the summer of , and director John Carpenter is on the cusp of releasing his latest movie, The Thing. In science fiction magazine Starlog, critic Alan Spencer wrote, "John Carpenter's The Thing smells, and smells pretty bad. A few days in to the Kickstarter for Volume 10, and we've doubled our goal, which is I'm super happy about. But here's the thing. I want more. The Thing is a science fiction horror film directed by Matthijs van Heijningen Jr. and When she and Juliette look for the vehicles' keys to prevent anyone from leaving, Juliette transforms and tries to attack Kate, but she flees past Karl.